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Option II: HMHV-HHS Concentration

Since you, as the student, must assume FULL RESPONSIBILITY for meeting all graduation requirements, we recommend that you keep your advisement documents in a safe place. You may need to refer back to these documents when meeting with various advisors on campus.

Option II Features

  • Freedom to explore different subject areas versus studying one subject area
  • Opportunity to create your own major from the subject areas of:
    • Physical & Natural Sciences
    • Math
    • Humanities
    • Fine Arts
    • Social/Behavioral Sciences

Option II Academic Plan Template

See a sample 4-year academic plan

Option II Worksheet

Worksheet

Option II Major Requirements (33 Hours)

The following are possible options of courses to choose from. In consultation with the HMHV advisor, students may choose courses from the departments listed below.

Math/Physical & Natural Sciences (9 hours, 3 must 300 or higher)

Select three courses from this area.

CLICK HERE for a list of recommended courses

  • Math
    • Math 181: Elements of Calculus II
  • Biology
    • Biol 237, 238: Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II
    • Biol 351 & 352L: General Microbiology
    • Biol 412: Developmental Biology
    • Biol 416/L: Histology
    • Biol 425: Molecular Genetics
    • Biol 428: Human Heredity
    • Biol 429: Molecular Cell Biology I
    • Biol 435/L: Animal Physiology
    • Biol 439/L: Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory
    • Biol 444:Genomes & Genomic Analysis
    • Biol 445: Biology of Toxins
    • Biol 446: Laboratory Methods in Molecular Biology
    • Biol 447: Prosection
    • Biol 448: Microbial Diversity
    • Biol 450: Virology
    • Biol 456: Immunology
    • Biol 460: Microbial Physiology
    • Biol 482/L: Parasitology
    • Biol 490: The Biology of Infectious Organisms
    • Biol 492: Introductory Mathematical Biology
    • Biol 493: Intermediate Mathematical Biology
    • Biol 497: Principles of Gene Expression Anthropology
    • Anth 150, 151L: Evolution/Human Emergence
    • Anth 251: Forensic Anthropology
    • Anth 350: Human Biology (heredity, genetics, etc.)
    • Anth 365: Anthropology of Health Biochemistry
    • Biochem 463, 464: Biochemistry of Disease I & II
  • Chemistry
    • Chem 315: Physical Chemistry
    • Chem 421: Biological Chemistry
  • Accepted Departments
    • Anthropology
    • Biochemistry
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • Earth & Planetary Sciences
    • Environmental Science
    • Geography
    • Mathematics
    • Physics & Astrophysics
    • Statistics

Humanities/Fine Arts (9 hours, 6 must 300 or higher)

Select three courses from this area.

CLICK HERE for a list of recommended courses

  • History
    • Hist 416, 417: History of Medicine
  • Religion
    • Relig 447: Comparative Religious Ethics
  • English
    • Engl 413: Scientific, Environmental, and Medical Writing
  • Philosophy
    • Phil 245: Professional Ethics
  • Accepted Departments
    • African American Studies
    • American Studies
    • Asian Studies
    • Classical Studies
    • Comparative Literature & Cultural Studies
    • Economics-Philosophy
    • English
    • English-Philosophy
    • European Studies
    • French
    • German
    • History
    • Languages
    • Latin American Studies
    • Philosophy
    • Portuguese
    • Religious Studies
    • Russian
    • Russian Studies
    • Spanish

Social/Behavioral sciences (9 hours, 6 must 300 or higher)

Select three courses from this area.

CLICK HERE for a list of recommended courses

  • Political Science
    • Pol Sc 376: Health Policy and Politics
    • Pol Sc 377: Population Policy and Politics
  • Sociology
  • Soc 300: Social Welfare: Policies and Programs
  • Soc 321: Sociology of Medical Practice
  • Economics
    • Econ 335: Health Economics
    • Econ 410: Topics in Health Economics
  • Psychology
    • Psych 220: Developmental Psychology
    • Psych 240: Brain and Behavior
    • Psych 332: Abnormal Behavior
    • Psych 342: Evolution, Brain and Behavior
  • Accepted Departments
    • African American Studies
    • American Studies
    • Anthropology
    • Asian Studies
    • Classical Studies
    • Comparative Literature & Cultural Studies
    • Criminology
    • Economics
    • Economics-Philosophy
    • European Studies
    • Journalism & Mass Communication
    • Latin American Studies
    • Linguistics
    • Political Science
    • Psychology
    • Signed Language Interpreting
    • Sociology
    • Women Studies

Electives (6 hours)

Select two courses for this requirement.
Select from courses approved by Arts & Sciences

CLICK HERE for a list of course limitations

  • No credit is given for courses which are by nature remedial, tutorial, skills or preparatory. Examples are: any course number 100, and such courses as Psych 109, Libr 110, 120, 160, 220, Women Studies 181, 182.
  • Only 4 hours of practicum or activity courses such as PE and dance or ensemble music.
  • Courses in ensemble music or dance: up to 4 hours, separately or in combination.
  • Declared dance minors may exceed the 4-hour limit in dance only to the extent required by the Theatre & Dance Department.
  • USP courses that are approved for credit by the College of Arts and Sciences: up to 4 hours.
  • No credit is given for any courses that are primarily technical or vocational, such as courses in Radiography, Business Technology Programs, etc.
  • No credit is given for most courses oriented toward professional practice, such as those taught by Nursing, Pharmacy, Elementary Education, Health Promotion, Health Education, Physical Education and Leisure Programs, or any courses with a “T” suffix.
  • Courses in methods of high school teaching, provided these courses are required for certification in a single or composite field: up to 12 hours. Secondary Education minors may exceed the 12-hour limit to the extent required for this minor.
  • 24 hours of Family Studies courses for Psychology, Criminology, and Sociology majors with a minor in Human Services.
  • For courses taken in a law or medical school: Students may enroll in these courses in pursuit of their own interests, but should not expect degree credit for them.